Connect with us

Opinion

Who is afraid of Yemi Akinwumi?

Published

on

Share this story

By Tunde Olusunle

Back in December 2020, Chris Adighije, a former senator representing Abia central, who is the present chairman of the governing board of the Federal University Lokoja, (FUL), sat on a meeting of the board to appoint a new vice chancellor, (VC), for the institution. It was a very rigorous process, because a whopping 81 candidates applied for the job. The list was pruned down to a more manageable 20, in an attempt to sift the proverbial chaff, from the wheat. At the end of the exercise, Yemi Akinwumi, a seasoned professor of history and international studies, was unanimously selected and appointed VC of the fledgling institution.

Adighije noted at the end of the exercise, that the selection process was extremely transparent, consistent with due process,
free and fair. According to him, “the selection board made up of two external members of the Council and two internal members from the Senate of the institution, (with himself as chairman), conducted interviews for 14 applicants who appeared before the board. Professor Olayemi Durotimi Akinwumi, who is currently the Deputy Vice Chancellor of Nasarawa State University, came first; Professor Akintayo Emmanuel Temitope from Ekiti State, came second, while Professor Krekere Tawari Fufeye from Bayelsa, came third.”

The chairman of the FUL governing board, described the process as “seamless and peaceful” and one which had produced the third chief executive of the institution, since it was established in 2011. Akinwumi succeeded Professor Angela Freeman Miri, who completed her five year term in office, Monday February 15, 2021. He was hailed as the first Kogi State indigene to be appointed to the position, which ordinarily, should be a source of delight to the people of the state.

Akinwumi came very prepared for the top job of the FUL. I should know because I have diligently followed his academic and professional trajectory, over the past four decades. He is my longstanding classmate, close friend and bosom brother so to speak. I shared the same faculty, hostel and social clubs with him at the University of Ilorin, (Unilorin), where we both studied. He read History, while I studied English, both of us graduating in 1985. We both returned to our alma mater in 1987, for our masters degrees and lived in the same hostel.

We completed our postgraduate work in 1989, and he was promptly engaged as a lecturer by his department, to make his knowledge and experience available to younger students. He obtained his doctorate on the job, rising to the rank of senior lecturer (which Americans describe as assistant professor), in 1996. For five years, between 1999 and 2004, Akinwumi was at the *Institut for Ethnologie, Freie Universitat,* Berlin, Germany, as visiting professor. My wife and I were his guests during his stint in Germany, and Akinwumi practically set aside everything he was doing, just to make us comfortable.

On his return to Nigeria in 2004, Akinwumi was courted by many universities. He settled for the Nasarawa State University, Keffi, (NSUK), where the renowned scholar, educationist and administrator, Professor Adamu Baikie, was pioneering the development of the new institution, in his capacity as its premiere VC. Akinwumi straddled every possible academic and administrative position in the university, including head of department; dean of faculty; dean of postgraduate studies; director of the institute of governance and development studies; chairman of the committee of deans, and deputy vice chancellor, (DVC), respectively. He aggregated tremendous goodwill for the accelerated development of the institution, courtesy of his extensive contacts and linkages, across the world.

A very highly decorated academic, Akinwumi’s perspiration and commitment to scholarship, has earned him several awards, notably the: Ali Mazrui Award for Academic Excellence, in Kenya; the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Studies Award, in South Africa; and the prestigious German Alexander von Humboldt Award, among others. He has also received the Nord-Sud-Kooperation Award of the University of Zurich, Switzerland; the European Research Award, University College, London; the Institute of Commonwealth Studies Award, also in the University of London and the German Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, DAAD Award, in Germany.

Akinwumi, who turned 58, January 20, 2022, is the immediate past president of the Historical Society of Nigeria, and a distinguished fellow of the body. He is also a fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Letters, (FNAL), among others. He is credited with nearly a century of publications in local and international journals, books and festschrifts. He has also authored several books, notably: *Conflict and Crises in Nigeria: A Political History  since 1960,* and *Colonial Contest for the Nigerian Region: A History of the German Participation.* He has attended conferences in no less than 30 countries across the world.

Since he assumed office February 15, 2021, however, Akinwumi has been the butt of sustained misrepresentation, unrelenting character assassination, serial media bullying, continuing tar-brushing and very malicious attacks. Every now and again, unattributed reports are hoisted on terrestrial mediums, spewing all manner of concocted tales and fables. When Akinwumi is not being falsely accused of increasing school fees, he is targeted for the award of phantom contracts to his cronies. When he is not being savaged for outsourcing the planning of FUL’s convocation ceremony, barbs are fired at him, for empowering his aides, to the detriment of other members of staff. A few weeks back, one of these mushrooming online publications, simulated a query issued by the governing council, to Akinwumi, at a time when the same council, publicly passed a vote of confidence on his leadership of the institution.

Days back, another report accused Akinwumi of drunkenness and cavorting with females under his watch! Fictional addresses in Lokoja were cited as the regular rendezvous of the renowned scholar, among similar balderdash. Those of us who know Akinwumi, know for a fact, that he is a teetotaller. Yes, he entertains his guests with their desired beverages, but he cannot be found with anything beyond water or non-alcoholic drinks. Womanising has never been his attribute in the almost 40 years I have known him, either, let alone, to be found feeding on the proverbial vegetation beneath his belly. The Yemi Akinwumi we know, is a career bookworm, a virtual introvert. His humility is unequalled, an attribute which breeds misconception by those just getting to know him. Even as VC, Akinwumi has been photographed distributing question papers to students in the examination hall and staying through, to supervise the process.

From all indications, Akinwumi’s travails emanate from the very institution he superintends over. Yes, as the Yoruba proverb says, the pest which is afflicting the vegetable plant, is resident inside the plant itself. Some of his co-contestants for the position of VC, a little over a year ago, are personnel of the FUL. There is this sense of entitlement by some academics who come from so-called numerically superior ethnicities and cultures in Kogi State who  are within the FUL system. They believe they reserve the right of first refusal, for plum positions, in institutions and establishments, domiciled in Kogi State.

The same mentality, tinctures the worldview of these people, even in the larger sociopolitics of Kogi State. I remember for instance, a longserving governor of the state from Kogi east,  addressing leaders from my local government area back in 2011, and telling us his “people said he could not hand the governorship ticket to any other ethnicity, except theirs, failing which, he said, they will kill him!” As though the fellow was elected and enthroned, strictly and singularly on the strength of the tally of votes of his kinsmen, without the support of the electorate from other local government areas, federal constituencies and senatorial zones. And this is a state peopled by diverse tongues and disparate traditions, who should have equitable stakes in the affairs and commonwealth of the geopolity, for crying out loud.

It is on record for instance, that a group chaired by one Abdul Amade, on behalf of a certain sociocultural group in Kogi State, on December 11, 2020, petitioned the education minister, Adamu Adamu, calling for the cancellation of the selection process, which produced Akinwumi. This was because the exercise did not produce a VC from the preferred locale of the said group. Yet, worthy of note is that since the establishment of the state-owned Abubakar Audu University, Anyigba, for instance, only intellectuals from Kogi east zone monopolized the headship of the institution until the appointment of the incumbent Mariyetu Ohunene Tenuche, by the Yahaya Bello administration.

As one of his primary tasks upon his assumption of duty Monday February 15, 2021, Akinwumi moved to appease disgruntled individuals, groups and tendencies, which were still belly-aching about their loss in the VC contest. He set the tone of a new verve, novel gusto and urgency in the administration of FUL,  encouraging professors within the system who were due, but yet to deliver their inaugural lectures, to promptly do so. He rehabilitated structures in the new and permanent site of the university, to accelerate the relocation of the university from its temporary site at the centre of Lokoja the state capital, to the permanent site on the Okene-Lokoja-Abuja highway.

Akinwumi set up a college of medicine for the university just months into his administration, even as all the courses in FUL, have been re-accredited by the National Universities Commission, (NUC). The university has been rated the best of the 12 created under the dispensation of former president Goodluck Jonathan in 2011. It also occupies the sixth position of all the federal universities in the country.

Akinwumi’s application to duty and successes within just one year of his five-year term in office, continue to astound his adversaries. Unable to pick holes in his professional and official brief, anonymous characters whose minds brim with bile and hatred, have resorted to sundry distractions and vindictive pursuits. Simply put, they are afraid of Akinwumi’s towering profile and diminished by his unbelievable triumphs thus far. He will yet build FUL into an institution of international acclaim, so faceless dissenters will do better to reconcile themselves with reality and join hands with Akinwumi on his path to making history.

Tunde Olusunle, PhD, poet, journalist, author and writer is a Member of the Nigerian Guild of Editors, (NGE).

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Opinion

Disability is not a barrier

Published

on

By

Share this story

Throughout history, individuals with disabilities have faced various challenges and prejudices in their daily lives. However, it is important to recognize that disability is not a barrier to success or personal fulfillment. With the right support and mindset, individuals with disabilities can achieve their goals and make significant contributions to society.

A prevalent misjudgment about disability is that it limits a person’s abilities and potential. In reality, many with disabilities have demonstrated excellence in myriad pursuits, including education, career, and personal relationships. For example, renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, despite being diagnosed with ALS at a young age, made groundbreaking contributions to the field of theoretical physics. His feats proved disability does not equate to incapacity.

Let’s get back to our clime, our own Hon. Arome Ibrahim made outstanding impacts as Disability Commission Chairman. His disabled condition did not impair his competent discharge of duties. He showed the world disability imposes no barriers and cannot equate to ineptness.

Moreover, societal attitudes toward disability considerably influence the opportunities available to the disabled. When society focuses on accommodating and empowering the disabled rather than dismissing them as inferior or helpless, it cultivates greater inclusion and accessibility. By promoting a culture of diversity and acceptance, we can create a more inclusive and supportive environment for all individuals, regardless of their abilities.

The resilience and resolve exhibited by many with disabilities also warrants recognition. Despite myriad obstacles, they frequently demonstrate extraordinary perseverance and valor in pursuing their ambitions and goals. Such tenacity serves as a powerful reminder that with the proper support and mindset, no limits exist regardless of one’s physical or cognitive constraints.

Disability should not be seen as an impediment to success or happiness. By challenging stereotypes, promoting inclusivity, and embracing diversity, we can empower individuals with disabilities to achieve their full potential and lead fulfilling lives. It is crucial for society to recognize and celebrate the unique abilities and contributions of individuals with disabilities, as their experiences and perspectives enrich our collective human experience. By fostering a more inclusive and supportive society, we can create a world where disability is truly not a barrier.

Courtesy: Kogi State Community Advocacy Group On Disability Inclusion

Continue Reading

Opinion

Edo 2024: Can Tinubu bell the ‘cats’ in APC’s primary fiasco?

Published

on

By

Gov Hope Uzodinma
Share this story

By Ehichioya Ezomon

“Even among thieves there’s honour,”is the sentiment that “criminals have a code of conduct among themselves.” According to grammarist.com, “some aspects of this code of conduct may be to not steal from each other, or to not testify against a fellow criminal to the police.”
Is there such a “code of conduct” among politicians? It’s doubtful, as among politicians – like among dogs – the first to die becomes the meat for the rest of the pack. If there’s really honour among politicians, heads would’ve rolled since the evening of Saturday, February 17 over the botched governorship primary election of the All Progressives Congress (APC) in Edo State, to choose a candidate for the September 21 governorship poll.
It’s such a messy affair that President Bola Tinubu’s invited to step in. So, will Tinubu prove the doubting Thomas wrong – coupled with his preachment of equity, fairplay and rule of law – by summoning the political will and courage, cancel the charade of a primary election, and save the APC from a second defeat in four years in Edo State?
Perhaps, the President has shown some spine, as the APC’s National Working Committee (NWC) has declared the primaries “inconclusive” after meeting and briefing Tinubu about the chaotic outcome of the exercise, and “the President expressed concerns at the turn of events, and directed the NWC to ensure that the exercise was concluded,” as first reported by The Nation on February 21.
Hence their tails tucked in-between their legs, the Abdullahi Ganduje-led NWC, after an emergency meeting on February 20, scheduled the completion of the primaries for Thursday, February 22, going by a statement by the national publicity secretary of the APC, Mr Felix Morka, fielding questions from reporters after the NWC meeting.
Morka said: “At its emergency meeting held today, Tuesday, February 20, 2024, to consider the report on the Edo State Governorship Primary Election, the National Working Committee (NWC) deliberated on the report and resolved that the Edo State Governorship Primary Election has not been completed, and has now fixed Thursday, February 22, 2024, for the completion of the Primary Election Process.”
Dr Ganduje and his team didn’t have to await Tinubu’s directive on what to do to rectify the controversial primaries. In a best case scenario, the APC leadership would’ve acted swiftly, called for calm, and given the assurance to members, particularly in Edo State, that it’d look into the primary misadventure through the primary election appeals committee instituted ahead of the exercise by the NWC. 
And in a worst case scenario, the party would’ve dismissed the conflicting declarations made – with four aspirants laying claim to winning the primaries – dissolved the Governor Hope Uzodimma-led primary election committee, and fixed a new date for a re-run or fresh primary poll within days, to meet the February 24 deadline set by the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC).
But what did Nigerians – particularly the shocked and distrust members of the APC in Edo State – see and hear from the leadership of the party? A congratulatory message in the night of February 17 from the national chairman, Ganduje, “to the winner of the primaries,” and solicitation for the “defeated aspirants” to “bury the hatchet” and work for party unity to win the Edo governorship.
As of Sunday, February 18, four aspirants claimed that they won the primaries – supervised by Governor Uzodimma, Cross River State Governor Bassey Otu, and five other members of the APC Edo Governorship Primary Election – to choose a candidate for the September 21 election. 
The primary election claimants include Hon. Dennis Idahosa, a member representing Ovia Federal Constituency in the House of Representatives, who’s declared as the winner by the Uzodimma committee; and Senator Monday Okpebholo (APC, Edo Central), who’s declared the winner by the NWC-appointed state chief collation and returning officer, Dr Stanley Ugboajah.
The others are Hon. Anamero Dekeri, member representing Etsako Federal Constituency, pronounced the winner by local government returning officers; and Mr Clem Agba, former minister of state for Budget and National Planning, who claims that going by the turnout of voters, he won the majority of lawful votes of APC members, and has threatened legal action to affirm his “victory.”
Tension had enveloped the Edo political landscape when – on the eve of the primaries, two of the leading aspirants – former Secretary to the State Government and twice governorship candidate, Pastor Osagie Ize-Iyamu, and former Deputy Governor Lucky Imasuen withdrew from the race, citing the APC leadership’s zoning of the governorship to Edo Central that’s been marginalised in the governance of the state since civilian democracy returned in Nigeria in 1999.
Amid reports that the primaries didn’t hold in virtually all 192 wards of the 18 local government areas of Edo State, results started flying on social media, and coming in droves from the local government collation agents and returning officers into the designated state collation centre in Benin City, capital city of Edo State.
But midway into the televised collation of the primary results, scores of armed political thugs invaded the centre – and in the presence of security operatives, and INEC officials – disrupted the proceedings, and beat up journalists, electoral officials and destroyed laptops and television cameras. 
Until that moment, it’s assumed that the primary election was one for all the aspirants. But the Uzodimma-headed committee, perhaps apprised in advance about the hoodlums’ attack, relocated to another venue, where it declared Hon. Idahosa as winner of the primaries, even as only eight of the 18 local government areas’ results had been collated.
Recall that stakeholders in Edo APC had protested Uzodimma’s appointment to head the primary election committee, alleging that he’d do a hatchet job for Senator and former Governor Adams Oshiomhole, who’d openly canvassed – even in a viral video on social media on the eve of the primaries – for Idahosa’s candidacy.
So, Uzodimma, willy-nilly, proved the Edo APC stakeholders right by taking advantage of the mileu caused by the political thugs at the collation centre to announce Idahosa as “winner” of the primaries, despite Senator Okpebholo leading in the results of eight councils declared before the thugs struck.
Still, amid the uproar that greeted Uzodimma’s declaration of Idahosa as the “duly nominated candidate,” Mr Ganduje, in a rather fait accompli statement by his chief press secretary, Mr Edwin Olofu, congratulated the “winner,” and called on the “defeated aspirants” to support him for the unity of the APC.
“I want to congratulate the winner of the Edo State governorship election, I want to equally commend and appreciate Governor Hope Uzodimma’s election committee for their hard work and the transparent manner in which the primary election was conducted,” Ganduje said.
“At this point, I want to call on all the aspirants to bury the hatchet and work for the interest of the party so that our party will emerge victorious (on September 21),” Ganduje added.
Was Ganduje’s congratulatory message to Hon. Idahosa hasty, as alleged by aggrieved  supporters of the “defeated aspirants,” or played into a script written by Comrade Oshiomhole to smoothen the primary path for his “anointed candidate,” Idahosa?
As seen in a trending video 24 hours to the election, as first reported by THISDAY, Oshiomhole claimed that President Tinubu had adopted Idahosa as the APC governorship candidate, a claim debunked by the deputy chairman of the Edo State APC gubernatorial primaries committee and Cross River Governor Otu.
Sen. Otu “categorically dismissed the rumour that President Tinubu has anointed a particular aspirant for the Edo APC gubernatorial primaries,” and “urged party faithful to disregard the lie and vote for their choice candidate.” 
“This perhaps fuelled counter-narrative on the eve of the primaries, that the Presidency had settled for an aspirant from Edo Central, to be anointed for equity, justice and fairplay, and that Senator Monday Okpebholo is the anointed candidate,” THISDAY reports.
.The same narrative of endorsement led to the withdrawal of Pastor Ize-Iyamu from the race, “with a directive to his supporters to cast their votes for Okpebholo,” and the subsequent withdrawal by former Mr Imasuen, citing the reported APC zoning of the governorship to Edo Central.
In the interim, the national publicity secretary of the APC, Mr Felix Morka, defended Uzodimma’s declaration, and dismissed the affirmation by the chief returning officer, saying the NWC had empowered Uzodimma to make the final return on the primaries. 
Morka said: “We wish to state categorically that only the Governor Hope Uzodinma-led Edo State APC Governorship Primary Election Committee is duly authorized to undertake final collation and announcement of results of the Primary Election in the state. We urge all party members, officials in the state, and the general public to disregard the said announcement of results by these unauthorized persons.”
But a letter signed by the APC National Organising Secretary, Sulaiman Mohammad Argungu, appointed Ugboajah as the State Chief Returning Officer, with 18 others as Local Government Area Returning Officers for each of the 18 local government areas of Edo State.
So, who had the authority, between Uzodimma and Ugboajah, to make pronouncement on the outcome of the primaries, as the two were on legitimate duty?
Nonetheless, the Edo chapter of the APC, via its publicity secretary, Prince Igbinigie, describing the conduct of Uzodimma as “most embarrassing, unfortunate and bizarre,” faulted the governor’s “usurpation” of the duties of the local government collation agents and the returning officers for the primaries.
Mr Igbinigie alleged that “upon learning that his preferred aspirant wasn’t winning, Uzodimma singlehandedly relocated the collation centre, and then unilaterally assumed the role of the state’s returning officers without recourse to inputs from the local government collation agents as well as the chief returning officer of the exercise.”
However, Igbinigie said after normalcy was restored at the “recognised collation centre,” with the local government area returning officers and representatives from INEC, the results were declared by Dr Ugboajah, “whose responsibility it is to carry out this function.” 
Reeling out the scores by 11 of the original 12 cleared aspirants for the primaries, with Sen. Okpebholo having 12,145 votes, and Hon. Idahosa getting 5,536 votes for the first and second positions, respectively, Igbinigie said: “Therefore, it is the desire of the state working committee to reiterate that Sen. Monday Okpebholo is the duly elected gubernatorial candidate of our great party for the September 2024 governorship election.” 
Meanwhile, one of the leading aspirants and court-removed former Governor Oserheimen Osunbor has appealed to President Tinubu to step in and arrest the primary crises allegedly instigated to divide the APC for the PDP to retain power in September. Prof. Osunbor asked Tinubu to:
(1) Cause an investigation to be instituted into the allegation that this sham of a primary election, and the crises it has generated, have been induced by gratification given and received by the principal actors to damage APC and pave the way for the emergence of the PDP candidate in the election.
(2) Order the cancellation of the primary election, which has produced two or four candidates, as it can’t stand the test of legal scrutiny but rather will jeopardize the chances of APC, as there’s been “a brazen disregard of the Party Guidelines, Party Constitution and the Electoral Act, which may prove fatal in the event of litigation.”
(3) Order another primary election to be conducted ahead of the 24th February deadline set by INEC. Different officers should be assigned to conduct the fresh primaries.
Declaring that, “I make this appeal as the most popular aspirant with name recognition and acceptability throughout the length and breadth of Edo State,” Osunbor, at a press conference on February 18 in Ekpoma, Esan West of Edo State, said registered members of the APC across the state came out to vote for their preferred candidate, but “to their disappointment, the election did not take place anywhere that I know of across the 18 local government areas of Edo State.”
“The party officials deployed from the Abuja office of the National Organising Secretary to conduct the elections at the various wards and local government areas of Edo State were kept in hotels in Benin,” Osunbor said, adding, “There is no record or video of any of them preforming their assigned roles in the election at their respective designated points.”
“What we saw on television was not result of election but allocation of votes by some persons in Benin to each of the aspirants. In the end, two candidates have been announced as winners, Sen. Monday Okpebholo and Hon. Denis Idahosa in a primary election that was never held or was not conducted in accordance with the law and guidelines. 
“This charade confirms the widespread suspicion that they are labouring to present a weak APC candidate that will be easily over-run and defeated by the presumed PDP candidate during the election. They are not working in the interest of APC but of PDP. We must avoid a repeat of the scenario which led to the defeat of APC in 2020.”
Also on February 18 in Abuja, after an emergency meeting, APC stakeholders rooting for Hon. Dekeri, called on Ganduje and President Tinubu to, “as a matter of honour, discard Governor Uzodimma’s infamous declaration of one Mr. Denis Idahosa, who didn’t win the primaries.” 
Spokesman of the forum, Mr Emmanuel Godwin, said Uzodimma wasn’t the chief returning officer for the election, and accused the primary committee of “usurping the duties and responsibilities of local government returning officers in the Edo State primaries.”
Godwin said: “It is unfortunate that Hope Uzodimma, who is not the returning officer in whatever capacity, assumed the position and went ahead to announce Dennis Idahosa when the returning officers were still collating the results.
“We wish to therefore state categorically that the purported announcement is null and void and it should be disregarded in its entirety. Governor Uzodimma lacks the power to usurp duties and responsibilities of local government returning officers in the Edo State primaries.”
In the lead-up to the February 17 primary election Ganduje, and Uzodimma presented themselves as democrats, who wanted things done as laid out in the rulebook of the party. On February 15, at the national headquarters of the APC in Abuja, the former governor of Kano State, inaugurated the APC Edo Governorship Primary Election and Appeals Committees for the direct primary poll.
Specifically on the appeals committee, Ganduje, who vows to reclaim Edo State from the opposition Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), to expand the coast of the ruling APC in Nigeria, said: “It is a tradition for us to always constitute a body that will undertake an assignment so that at the end of it, we get good results.
“I will like to inform you that the composition of the two committees is a product of the National Working Committee (NWC) in accordance with the constitution of our party. Whatever you do, the contestants are free to appeal. That is why we have an appeals committee, which is like the Supreme Court.”
From hindsight, the Ganduje message was a double-edged sword: Members of the primary election committee should conduct a credible and transparent election acceptable to the aspirants, their supporters, and members of the APC; and whatever the outcome of the poll, the aspirants shouldn’t rock the boat, but appeal for a possible remedy.
Responding, Uzodimma thanked Ganduje and the NWC for the confidence reposed in the members, promised to discharge their assignment with utmost diligence, and stressed that, “Our prayers is that we work hard to justify this confidence reposed in us,” as “our party is a fantastic brand, very popular, and a good product.”
“It behooves on members of our committee to work in harmony with the party’s local leadership in Edo, to bring up a product that will look like our party and is easily marketable in Edo,” Uzodimma said, and urged the APC leadership to pray to God Almighty “to give us the wherewithal to carry out our assignment.”
In the end, did Ganduje and Uzodimma carry out the duty of producing a sellable, marketable and acceptable candidate in accordance with the dictates of the constitution of the APC? No, they did the opposite, in connivance with the local potentate, Comrade Oshiomhole who, from the get go, had primed Hon. Idahosa as his “anointed candidate” for the governorship. 
Pre-the primary election, the APC NWC sent officials to the wards and local government areas of Edo State, to authentic the number of actual and financial members of the party – a finding that revealed that only about 42,000 members were qualified to participate in the primaries.
Surprisingly, announcing the results several hours before the completion of collation, Governor Uzodimma ascribed 40,453 votes cast by the verified 42,000 members to Hon. Idahosa alone. Other aspirants’ scores were: Anamero Dekeri, 2,030 votes; Monday Okpebholo, 100; Clem Agba, 100; Osagie Ize-Iyamu, 2; Gideon Ikhine, 700; David Imuse, 400; Charles Airhiavbere, 162; Oserheimen Osunbor, 180; Blessing Agbomhere, 50; Ernest Umakhihe, 2; and Lucky Imasuen, 2 votes.
“This is to certify that Dennis Idahosa, having scored the highest number of votes, is hereby declared winner of the primary election,” Uzodimma said.
In the results declared by Ugboajah, Sen. Okpebholo received 12,145 votes; Dennis Idahosa, 5,536; Afolabi Umakhihe, 2,090; Anamero Dekeri, 1,625; Charles Arhiavbere, 919; Gideon Ikhine, 902; Oserheimen Osunbor, 688; David Imuse, 507; Lucky Imasuen, 503; and Osagie Ize-Iyamu, 383 votes. Clem Agba’s name and score weren’t included.
“This is to certify that Monday Okpebholo has scored the highest votes, and declared winner of the APC governorship primary and thereby declared the candidate of the party,” Dr Ugboajah said.
And in the results announced on Saturday night by Mr Ojo Babatunde for the local government returning officers, Hon. Dekeri got 25,384 votes, while Idahosa received 14,127 votes. No votes were recorded for Okpebholo and nine other aspirants.
 
If any of the three results declared by the different authorities of the APC Primary Election Committee for Edo 2024 governorship election are considered, only Dr Ugboajah’s declaration merits giving any probative value, having followed the prescribed process of collation and declaration of results.
Besides, no matter their level of popularity and reach in Edo State, no single aspirant among the 10 that made it to the fiercely-contested primary, could secure even 15,000 votes, talkless of outlandish votes in excess of 40,000 from less than 42,000 members that voted. It’s daylight robbery to claim as such!
As the National Leader of the APC – an appellation he’d styled himself for eight years under the Muhammadu Buhari administration (2015-2023) – President Tinubu should show true leadership and cancel the bogus primary election in Edo State, and call for re-run or fresh primaries before the INEC deadline of February 24. Nothing else will assuage the electoral heist perpetrated on February 17! Edo people are watching and waiting, and may not forget their deliberate disenfranchishment on September 21!

Mr Ezomon, Journalist and Media Consultant, writes from Lagos, Nigeria

Continue Reading

Opinion

Edo Guber: A time for reflection, decision-making for the PDP

Published

on

By

Share this story

Politics, much like the tides, is a constantly evolving force. What was hailed as the prevailing political thinking yesterday may be discarded today, replaced by a new set of circumstances and dynamics.

In Edo State, this phenomenon is currently shaping the political landscape, particularly in the selection of a gubernatorial candidate for the upcoming 2024 elections.

In recent months, within the People’s Democratic Party (PDP), there has been a general sentiment that the governorship should be allocated to Edo Central.

This argument had gained traction, with a degree of acceptance among party members. However, the political tides of Edo State have since rapidly shifted.

With the All Progressives Congress (APC) preparing for their gubernatorial primaries on Saturday, strong indications suggest that the party will nominate a candidate from Edo South. This strategic move takes into account the fact that Edo South is home to the majority of voters in the state. By fielding a candidate from the south, the APC hopes to garner massive support from the Edo South electorate, capitalizing on the principle of regional loyalty.
Politics is a majority game. Emotions and sentiments cannot guarantee victory.
Also the voting population in Edo is as follows ; Edo south.62% Edo central.13% while Edo north has 25%.

This poses a challenging predicament for the PDP. If they choose to adhere to their initial inclination and nominate a candidate from Edo Central, they risk losing the popular vote. Additionally, considering the federal might of the APC in the center, the PDP may face an uphill battle in a state that has traditionally leaned towards their party.

Consequently, the PDP finds itself at a crossroads. Should they mirror the APC’s strategy and select a candidate from Edo South, they stand a higher chance of securing electoral success by appealing to the region’s voters. However, this decision would deviate from their original plan and disrupt the delicate balance within the party.

As the political dynamics continue to shift, the PDP’s choice becomes crucial in determining their prospects in the 2024 elections in Edo State. They must weigh their commitment to Edo Central against the potential consequences of alienating voters from the south. Striking the right balance is imperative if they are to maintain a competitive edge against the APC and have a fighting chance at victory.

In this delicate balancing act, the PDP must consider various factors, including regional loyalty, the overall political climate, and the aspirations of their party members and stakeholders. The ultimate goal is to select a candidate who can unite the party, appeal to a broad spectrum of voters, and withstand the impending political storms that lie ahead.

As Edo State traverses this intricate web of political dynamics, it is essential for parties and candidates to recognize the importance of adaptability and responsiveness. The ability to adapt to evolving circumstances while staying true to their core principles will be crucial in gaining the trust and support of the electorates.

They must navigate the complex political currents in order to arrive at a candidate who can lead them to victory. The outcome of this delicate choice will determine not only the party’s fate but also the trajectory of governance in Edo State for years to come.

-Moses Ekunwe from iguben . writes from Benin city

Continue Reading

Trending